Vocalabs Newsletter: Quality Times

Issue
108

Customer Experience is Driven by Core Values

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Customer Experience is Driven by Core Values

It seems that corporate culture may soon be having a moment. A recent article in Recode by Patrick Quinlan highlights the many recent high-profile examples of corporate misbehavior, such as Wells Fargo and Uber, and argues that the root cause of these problems is that many companies have viewed ethics through the lens of compliance rather than core values.

The problem, in Quinlan's view, is that for too long many companies have lacked any core values other than making money. Not breaking the law is also in there somewhere, but as a secondary consideration. You can see how this leads to problems. If a company's core values are "make money" and "don't break the law," but you only get fired if you don't make money, then employees are going to break the law and turn a blind eye when their peers and managers are a little loose with the legalities. This applies all the way from the C-suite to the salesman, except that the salesman is more likely to get blamed when misbehavior comes to light.

Customer Experience, like ethical behavior, is also driven by a company's core values. You hear most any CX expert talk about "Leadership" as one of the core components of success in Customer Experience, and this is what the Leadership is all about.

Effective leadership in Customer Experience means making the customer part of the mission and core values of the company. It's not just the business school mechanics of structure, governance, incentives, and metrics. It's about genuinely caring about how the company serves customers.

I don't know if Quinan is right, and that we are going to see more companies reevaluating their core values. I agree that the lack of any deep moral compass in most large businesses (other than "maximize profitability") is a huge problem today, and not just in the areas of not abusing customers or employees. I see it in the way that global tax evasion has become an accepted way of doing business, and the way some enormous companies don't seem to care whether or not their employees have to choose between eating, paying rent, or visiting the doctor.

So I do hope that this is going to become a greater part of the conversation. Because if a company can align itself with the right set of core values, many other things will be a lot easier, from Customer Experience to staying out of legal trouble.


The Most Important Metric in CX

The Minneapolis Chapter Meeting of the CXPA this month featured a panel discussion for Customer Experience Day. Four Customer Experience luminaries from the Twin Cities area fielded questions from a packed audience for the better part of an hour, but the very last question stood out.

"What is the most important Customer Experience metric?"

This prompted chin scratching and discussion of the relative merits of common survey metrics like NPS and Customer Effort, and general consensus that no one metric is ever going to give the whole picture, as well as the important fact that if you're focusing on finding the right metric then you're probably doing CX wrong.

I was not part of the panel (I'm not nearly luminous enough), but if I had been, my answer would have been different. Because I believe there is one metric that stands out above all others in measuring the progress of a company's Customer Experience efforts and predicting future success in harnessing all the financial and market benefits of being a customer-centric organization.

My metric, the One Metric to Rule Them All, is simple: The amount of attention a company's C-Suite leadership pays to Customer Experience.

I admit that I haven't actually tested this metric in the real world. Nor do I know anyone else who has--though I will cheerfully buy a beer for anyone cheeky enough to perform a time-tracking study on their company's C-Suite executives.

But everyone I talked to agreed that a measurement of senior leadership attention is likely to outperform NPS, CSAT, Customer Effort, and just about any other customer-facing metric you might care to devise. Leadership focus on Customer Experience is the most critical element of a successful CX program: if you've got the C-Suite pulling for CX, everything else tends to fall in place. But if the leadership is indifferent, then the whole program is going to be an uphill struggle.

The other piece of this is the leadership needs to be directly paying attention, and not just spending money and delegating CX to a team. In most large organizations attention is more scarce than money, and it quickly becomes apparent what the company actually cares about and what they merely think they should be doing.

So if you want to gauge the success of your CX program, there are many survey metrics you can use. But the truest measure will be to look inside and see how much time and attention you're getting from the most senior leadership.

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